What’s your favorite Greggo’s original?

Two weeks ago I conducted a poll asking you to name your favorite, second-favorite and least favorite “original” Greggo’s Game Shows. About forty of you responded and gave some really good feedback! I thank all of you for participating. Here are the results, giving games two points for being nominated as your favorite, one point for second-favorite and deducting one point for least favorite:

#1 Favorite: Farkle (42 points)

This game showed up as your favorite on 42% of the polls, least favorite on 0%.

Notable insights:
“…it FEELS like a 70s or 80s game show…”
“Great blend of having a look and feel of a traditional game show while being accessible to attendees, all while maintaining a great ‘play at home’ factor”
“I like the twist of the answers sometimes having nothing to do with the common thread. The rules are easy to follow, and there’s definitely plenty of suspense.”

#2 Favorite: Pokémon Game Show (28 points)

This game showed up as your favorite on 28% of the polls, least favorite on 13%.

Notable insights:
“Audience and player enthusiasm is a big part of what makes the Pokémon Game Show entertaining. Its play style makes it feel like a classic game show even though it’s original.”
“I love Pokémon Game Show due to its open concept as it allows for many different games to be played with the board, that way it keeps it fresh.”
“I always wondered if Classic Pokémon Game Show could be improved by asking one toss-up question to gain control, and then keep going in turn order until someone makes a match, to move the game a little faster. It just seems to drag when there’s a rash of questions that nobody knows–plus I think the true entertainment value of this game is when they get to play the board.”
One of you gave an overly-complicated way to “fix” the scoring for the game. I think I know which one of you made the post, and let me just mention that doing what you suggest would make it a 2-hour panel…it’s already almost too long as it is.


#3 Favorite: Know Your Role (11 points)

This game shows up as your favorite on 10% of the polls, least favorite on 5%.

Notable insights:
“Know Your Role is great with the question interaction and the rooting sections reminding me of Tattletales.”
“…Always hilarious, especially the look on their faces when they realize it’s them and they didn’t realize it.”

#4 Favorite: Stop The Music! (9 points)

This game shows up as your favorite on 10% of the polls, least favorite on 3%.

Notable insights:
“A good way to run an entertaining Name That Tune game. The original show’s format is just too difficult for con audiences.”
“There is almost NO play of it anymore.” (ed. Not true; it’s done about 10 times a year, I just can’t upload it to Youtube for fear of copyright strikes!)

#5 Favorite: Strikeout (9 points)

This game shows up as your favorite on 5% of the polls, least favorite on 5%.

Notable insights:
“It’s like Family Feud, but with the answers already given. Because all of the answers are already known, this encourages interaction with the crowd as they can suggest answers to the contestants.”
“A great theme with the baseball motif along with its game concept that makes it exciting.”
“Viewers at home can play too.”

Of the remaining games, Face Off earned a whopping 1 point and was voted least favorite on 13% of the polls. Shut the TARDIS!! and Ponyville Derby both scored well in the negative, and combined they were only the favorites on one poll while showing up as least favorite 55% of the time. I was expecting this of those two fandom-specific games; if you’re not a fan of My Little Pony: FIM or Doctor Who then these games won’t appeal to you, which is why they only get played at conventions with a large fan base.  Counting Pokémon, two-thirds of you voted themed games as your least favorite.

I will definitely be taking this feedback into consideration when it comes to which game shows get more play at conventions in 2019 and which game shows get put forth for funding for Youtube in future. Thanks so much for your input!

 

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Dropping Patreon

Apparently over the past 48 hours, due to Patreon moving their payment operations overseas, a lot (and I do mean a LOT) of patrons have had their payments flagged, declined or triggered as fraud. While it didn’t affect me as much as it did other creators, I’ve decided that this is the last straw with Patreon, so after this month, all videos will be individually funded through Indiegogo, Ko-Fi, and through direct contributions.

Those of you who supported me on Patreon last month have still contributed to two uploads for August, which are mentioned on my “next uploads” page. Those are still on track. For all future videos, I will have a list of ones you can contribute to; once they are funded, the footage will be sent to the editors and your name will appear in the credits.

More details to come over the weekend; this is my last weekend before a stretch of four consecutive convention weekends, so the intention is to have everything set up and ready to roll for this new funding approach before leaving for Otakon.

Thanks as always for your support!

Match Game retired

In 1999 I hosted my very first game show at an anime convention. “Anime Match Game” debuted at A-Kon nearly twenty years ago, and became a staple of that con and in my lineup for the next six years.  On the whole I’ve probably hosted the game upwards of fifty times since then.

It’s now 2018, and in a time where this country is divided more than it’s been in a long time, people tend to be overly sensitive about certain topics, many of which make for easy questions to write for the show. I no longer feel comfortable writing those sorts of questions, nor do I feel like I’m doing enough due diligence with the celebrity guests playing the game if I put one on the show and they inadvertently (or purposefully) say or do something that will hurt their career down the road. I don’t want to be responsible for that, so as of today, Match Game is retired.

You can see my updated game list here. Thanks for understanding.

Fact Sheet: Now You See It

Played only once back in 2009 as a celebrity game, Now You See It was retired immediately when some software issues caused the game to malfunction. It turns out that limitations on the computer used were the culprit, and I’ve decided to bring the game back for 2019 as a regular fandom game for two players.

(No video yet, game has yet to debut and no software is currently available to showcase.)

Now You See It was a successful Goodson/Todman show in the late seventies. It turns word searches into a fun game show format. Contestants have to find the answers to the questions on a jumbled board of letters before their opponent does in order to win points and get ever closer to a shot at the bonus game, where if they can find ten words in sixty seconds, they win the jackpot!

Technical:

This game requires 90 minutes including setup time.  It requires the use of projector and screen (VGA/HDMI and minijack). A minimum of three microphones is requested. Stage layout includes one table for the contestants (placed at stage left or stage right). A podium or lectern is also requested if available. Contestants must be able to see the display screen; stage positioning or the use of a “confidence monitor” is requested.

Preferred title for the program book/schedule:

Greggo’s Game Shows: Now You See It

Program book description:

Every answer to every question is hidden in a jumble of letters; all that you have to do is find them before your opponent does! Can you use your fandom knowledge to play this fun word search game show? Now you see it!

Prize support recommended:

A maximum of $50 or $150 worth of prizes, depending on whether or not badges to other (or you own) conventions can be acquired to give away as prizes. While this can sometimes be supplemented by my own prize support, it is recommended that the convention supplies prizes whenever possible. It is acceptable to offer gift certificates equal to the “cash value” won by the contestants in this game. Gift certificates may be requisitioned and acquired by the convention after the end of the event and sent to the winners.

Fact Sheet: Scrabble

One of the last classic television game shows I’ve always wanted to try was the 80s take on Scrabble, starring Chuck Woolery. I love puns and word games, and Scrabble’s the perfect combination of both. What I didn’t love, however, was the thought of creating the software to replicate the game. I procured help by licensing the excellent software created by Home Game Entertainment for a six-episode run for 2018. I am expecting to re-license for 2019 if allowed, so for now this will remain an active game on the schedule.

Scrabble has four contestants competing in two one-on-one matches trying to solve punny crossword clues. Each match earns the winner a go at the Scrabble Sprint, a timed contest where the contestant tries to solve four words as quickly as possible. The player with the fastest time goes on to the Bonus Sprint, where they can win bonus prizes for solving two more words in ten seconds or less. It has a fun audience playalong factor as well!

Technical:

This game requires 90 minutes including setup time.  It requires the use of projector and screen (VGA/HDMI and minijack). A minimum of three microphones is requested. Stage layout includes one table for the contestants (placed at stage left or stage right). A podium or lectern is also requested if available. Contestants must be able to see the display screen; stage positioning or the use of a “confidence monitor” is requested.

Preferred title for the schedule/program book:

Greggo’s Game Shows: Scrabble

Program book description:

It’s the crossword game you’ve played all your life, but never quite like this! Solve crossword clues based on your knowledge of anime, video game and cultural fandom! Here’s a warning: dad jokes aplenty!

Prize support recommended:

A maximum of $120 worth of prizes is recommended. While this can sometimes be supplemented by my own prize support, it is recommended that the convention supplies prizes whenever possible. It is acceptable to offer gift certificates equal to the “cash value” won by the contestants in this game. Gift certificates may be requisitioned and acquired by the convention after the end of the event and sent to the winners.

Fact Sheet: Hollywood Squares

In the early 2000s, Hollywood Squares was one of the games in my original lineup, and one of the first to debut. I put it away around 2005 because I started doing smaller cons, and because the logistics of getting nine guests together at one time was becoming harder and harder. In 2016 Sausomecon put together a guest list that contained many of my favorite guests, and I decided to bring the game back for a one-time tribute to the original “center square,” the late Bruce Lewis (bio from animecons.com). Conventions have expressed an interest in doing this show, so it is now an active game in the rotation.

One of the most famous celebrity games, Hollywood Squares features nine convention guests in a game of giant Tic Tac Toe. The guests are provided with the answers to the questions beforehand, so there’s very little pressure for them other than to be their regular entertaining selves. The contestant has to decide whether or not the answer the celebrity gives is correct or not (the guest may choose to bluff if they wish) in order to place their X or O. This game works great as a main event, especially if your convention has the ability to “build” the three-tiered game board which would place three guests on the floor in front of the stage, three guests on stage, and three guests on risers above the stage floor level.

Technical:

This game requires 90 minutes including setup time.  It requires the use of projector and screen (VGA/HDMI and minijack). A minimum of four microphones (ten is preferred) is requested. Stage layout includes one large table for the contestants and at least three tables for the nine guests. Ideally, risers for the stage allowing for an “upper tier” will be made available, with a “lower tier” on the floor in front of the stage. This is not a requirement but makes for a much better presentation. A lectern or podium may also be provided for the host.  This game requires the participation of nine (or more in the case of groups) convention guests. Please ask the guests prior to the convention whether or not they’d like to participate. Ideally the final guest roster will be completed prior to publishing of the convention book/schedule.

Preferred title for the program book:

Greggo Presents: Hollywood Squares featuring (2 or 3 headlining guests)

Program book description:

It’s a celebrity guest extravaganza! Join nine of our featured guests for a couple rounds of one of the most famous games in television history! One of our guests is the Secret Square…pick them and you could win a bonus prize! Tic Tac Toe has never been so much fun!

Prize support recommendation:

We play a “best-of-3” format for a grand prize, along with two “Secret Square” games involving a bonus prize. Appropriate prizes are requested from the convention. These can sometimes come from my own prize stock, but anything the convention can provide is always appreciated. Badges to future events are always acceptable prize support.