Match Game retired

In 1999 I hosted my very first game show at an anime convention. “Anime Match Game” debuted at A-Kon nearly twenty years ago, and became a staple of that con and in my lineup for the next six years.  On the whole I’ve probably hosted the game upwards of fifty times since then.

It’s now 2018, and in a time where this country is divided more than it’s been in a long time, people tend to be overly sensitive about certain topics, many of which make for easy questions to write for the show. I no longer feel comfortable writing those sorts of questions, nor do I feel like I’m doing enough due diligence with the celebrity guests playing the game if I put one on the show and they inadvertently (or purposefully) say or do something that will hurt their career down the road. I don’t want to be responsible for that, so as of today, Match Game is retired.

You can see my updated game list here. Thanks for understanding.

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Fact Sheet: Now You See It

Played only once back in 2009 as a celebrity game, Now You See It was retired immediately when some software issues caused the game to malfunction. It turns out that limitations on the computer used were the culprit, and I’ve decided to bring the game back for 2019 as a regular fandom game for two players.

(No video yet, game has yet to debut and no software is currently available to showcase.)

Now You See It was a successful Goodson/Todman show in the late seventies. It turns word searches into a fun game show format. Contestants have to find the answers to the questions on a jumbled board of letters before their opponent does in order to win points and get ever closer to a shot at the bonus game, where if they can find ten words in sixty seconds, they win the jackpot!

Technical:

This game requires 90 minutes including setup time.  It requires the use of projector and screen (VGA/HDMI and minijack). A minimum of three microphones is requested. Stage layout includes one table for the contestants (placed at stage left or stage right). A podium or lectern is also requested if available. Contestants must be able to see the display screen; stage positioning or the use of a “confidence monitor” is requested.

Preferred title for the program book/schedule:

Greggo’s Game Shows: Now You See It

Program book description:

Every answer to every question is hidden in a jumble of letters; all that you have to do is find them before your opponent does! Can you use your fandom knowledge to play this fun word search game show? Now you see it!

Prize support recommended:

A maximum of $50 or $150 worth of prizes, depending on whether or not badges to other (or you own) conventions can be acquired to give away as prizes. While this can sometimes be supplemented by my own prize support, it is recommended that the convention supplies prizes whenever possible. It is acceptable to offer gift certificates equal to the “cash value” won by the contestants in this game. Gift certificates may be requisitioned and acquired by the convention after the end of the event and sent to the winners.

Fact Sheet: Scrabble

One of the last classic television game shows I’ve always wanted to try was the 80s take on Scrabble, starring Chuck Woolery. I love puns and word games, and Scrabble’s the perfect combination of both. What I didn’t love, however, was the thought of creating the software to replicate the game. I procured help by licensing the excellent software created by Home Game Entertainment for a six-episode run for 2018. I am expecting to re-license for 2019 if allowed, so for now this will remain an active game on the schedule.

Scrabble has four contestants competing in two one-on-one matches trying to solve punny crossword clues. Each match earns the winner a go at the Scrabble Sprint, a timed contest where the contestant tries to solve four words as quickly as possible. The player with the fastest time goes on to the Bonus Sprint, where they can win bonus prizes for solving two more words in ten seconds or less. It has a fun audience playalong factor as well!

Technical:

This game requires 90 minutes including setup time.  It requires the use of projector and screen (VGA/HDMI and minijack). A minimum of three microphones is requested. Stage layout includes one table for the contestants (placed at stage left or stage right). A podium or lectern is also requested if available. Contestants must be able to see the display screen; stage positioning or the use of a “confidence monitor” is requested.

Preferred title for the schedule/program book:

Greggo’s Game Shows: Scrabble

Program book description:

It’s the crossword game you’ve played all your life, but never quite like this! Solve crossword clues based on your knowledge of anime, video game and cultural fandom! Here’s a warning: dad jokes aplenty!

Prize support recommended:

A maximum of $120 worth of prizes is recommended. While this can sometimes be supplemented by my own prize support, it is recommended that the convention supplies prizes whenever possible. It is acceptable to offer gift certificates equal to the “cash value” won by the contestants in this game. Gift certificates may be requisitioned and acquired by the convention after the end of the event and sent to the winners.

Fact Sheet: Hollywood Squares

In the early 2000s, Hollywood Squares was one of the games in my original lineup, and one of the first to debut. I put it away around 2005 because I started doing smaller cons, and because the logistics of getting nine guests together at one time was becoming harder and harder. In 2016 Sausomecon put together a guest list that contained many of my favorite guests, and I decided to bring the game back for a one-time tribute to the original “center square,” the late Bruce Lewis (bio from animecons.com). Conventions have expressed an interest in doing this show, so it is now an active game in the rotation.

One of the most famous celebrity games, Hollywood Squares features nine convention guests in a game of giant Tic Tac Toe. The guests are provided with the answers to the questions beforehand, so there’s very little pressure for them other than to be their regular entertaining selves. The contestant has to decide whether or not the answer the celebrity gives is correct or not (the guest may choose to bluff if they wish) in order to place their X or O. This game works great as a main event, especially if your convention has the ability to “build” the three-tiered game board which would place three guests on the floor in front of the stage, three guests on stage, and three guests on risers above the stage floor level.

Technical:

This game requires 90 minutes including setup time.  It requires the use of projector and screen (VGA/HDMI and minijack). A minimum of four microphones (ten is preferred) is requested. Stage layout includes one large table for the contestants and at least three tables for the nine guests. Ideally, risers for the stage allowing for an “upper tier” will be made available, with a “lower tier” on the floor in front of the stage. This is not a requirement but makes for a much better presentation. A lectern or podium may also be provided for the host.  This game requires the participation of nine (or more in the case of groups) convention guests. Please ask the guests prior to the convention whether or not they’d like to participate. Ideally the final guest roster will be completed prior to publishing of the convention book/schedule.

Preferred title for the program book:

Greggo Presents: Hollywood Squares featuring (2 or 3 headlining guests)

Program book description:

It’s a celebrity guest extravaganza! Join nine of our featured guests for a couple rounds of one of the most famous games in television history! One of our guests is the Secret Square…pick them and you could win a bonus prize! Tic Tac Toe has never been so much fun!

Prize support recommendation:

We play a “best-of-3” format for a grand prize, along with two “Secret Square” games involving a bonus prize. Appropriate prizes are requested from the convention. These can sometimes come from my own prize stock, but anything the convention can provide is always appreciated. Badges to future events are always acceptable prize support.

 

Fact Sheet: Chain Reaction

Chain Reaction is an example of a game show that needed to find its ideal participants. I retired it for a few years until a good number of voice actors entered the convention scene who were big fans before entering the industry. The previous version was deemed too difficult for some actors; these days the game is a lot more accessible and the guest pool is much more diverse.

Chain Reaction has been a successful television game show since its inception in 1980, having had several runs in both the United States and Canada. The front game premise involves teams of two celebrities and one contestant trying to figure out the six words in the middle of an eight-word “chain,” where each word connects in some way to any word it touches. For example, a chain could be TONGUE – FORKED – ROAD – RUNNER – MARATHON – MOVIE – POPCORN – BUTTER. My version of the game utilizes connections related to fandom for 80%+ of the words, which makes for a fun playalong factor for the audience at conventions.  The bonus game is a version of the improv game “Two-Headed Expert.” The actors see a word or phrase and must construct a question for the player whose answer is the word or phrase. The catch: Each actor may only add one word at a time to the question. It’s a fun end game that usually results in some hilarious moments for everyone involved, and the stakes are low enough so that it’s hard to walk away upset in case of a bad showing; the contestant will always win something no matter the result.

Technical:

This game requires 90 minutes including setup time.  It requires the use of projector and screen (VGA/HDMI and minijack). A minimum of three microphones is requested (seven is ideal). Stage layout includes two tables for the contestants (placed at stage left and stage right) and a podium or lectern in the center if one is available.

This game requires four convention guests as participants. Please ask the guests prior to the convention if they’re interested in participating. Ideally a final list would be approved prior to the program book’s printing.

Preferred title for the schedule:

Greggo Presents: Chain Reaction featuring (names of guests)

Program book description:

It’s the fun and challenging game show where one word leads to another! You and two celebrity partners try to solve a chain of words! If your team pulls through, you get to play for some nice bonus prizes in the “Instant Reaction” round! The guests choose the contestants that get to play, so make sure you’re attending their panels and autograph sessions and being a good fan, and you may be chosen!

Prize support recommendation:

A maximum of $120 worth of prizes. While this can sometimes be supplemented by my own prize support, it is recommended that the convention supplies prizes whenever possible. It is acceptable to offer gift certificates equal to the “cash value” won by the contestants in this game. Gift certificates may be requisitioned and acquired by the convention after the end of the event and sent to the winners.

 

Fact Sheet: Card Sharks

After having successfully hosted the British version over the last year’s worth of conventions, I’ve been given blessing to give the solo version a go. Debuting at AnimeFEST in Dallas this year, I’ll be bringing Card Sharks to anime conventions. A staple of the game show lineup for NBC and CBS during the late 70s/early 80s, classic episodes can be seen daily on Buzzr and Game Show Network.

(No video yet, expect the demo video in September/October. Refer to Play Your Cards Right for visuals/gameplay).

Two players face each other in a game of hi-lo, predicting whether each card in their line is higher or lower than the previous one. The fandom aspect here is in the hi-lo questions, survey questions about fandom asked to 100 people prior to the show. It’s got a fun audience playalong factor, as attendees get to yell their guesses to the contestants to keep them engaged and having fun during the show. There’s also something exciting about turning over stupidly huge playing cards!

Technical:

This game requires 90 minutes including setup time.  It requires the use of projector and screen (VGA/HDMI and minijack). A minimum of two microphones is requested (three is ideal). Stage layout includes one table for the contestants (placed at stage left or stage right) and two 6- or 8-foot tables placed at center stage or as near to it as possible, where we’ll be dealing and displaying the cards for the game.

Program book description:

It’s a new Greggo’s game show, based on predictions! We’ve asked 100 fans a series of survey questions prior to the show, and it’s up for you to correctly predict what those 100 people said! If you’re right, and then you play your cards right, you’ll have the chance to win lots of lovely loot! Make sure you’re there at the beginning of the show and you might be chosen to be one of our Card Sharks!

Prize support recommendation:

A maximum of $120 worth of prizes. While this can sometimes be supplemented by my own prize support, it is recommended that the convention supplies prizes whenever possible. It is acceptable to offer gift certificates equal to the “cash value” won by the contestants in this game. Gift certificates may be requisitioned and acquired by the convention after the end of the event and sent to the winners.